BrachEichler LLC Blog Feedhttp://www.roytalman.com/?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10en-us18 Dec 2017firmwisehttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rssWhy Are Some Jobs Open Forever And What Can We Do About It? http://www.roytalman.com?t=40&an=72389&anc=657&format=xml&p=8044 11 Dec 2017Blog<p>Company A has a job that needs to be filled. After the opening becomes available, one month passes. Then another month and another. Before long, it&rsquo;s well over six months, which begs the question: <b>Why isn't this job getting filled?</b></p> <p>On the surface of it, it would look like the company can&rsquo;t find a qualified candidate. However, my take is that it's probably something else.</p> <p>As certain industries &ndash; financial trading, for example &ndash; have been challenged by various business conditions, some companies are saying,&nbsp;<i>&quot;OK, we&rsquo;ve got some serious work to do. We can&rsquo;t just bring aboard a solid candidate to fill a role. We need somebody who will make a difference and help us compete extraordinarily better.&quot;</i></p> <p>Welcome to a whole new ballgame. Suddenly, someone meeting the criteria of being very well competent in their skill set may actually be insufficient. That&rsquo;s because a variety of companies are seeking the kind of candidate will give&nbsp;<b>their business</b>&nbsp;<b>a competitive edge</b>. That's a&nbsp;<i>much</i>&nbsp;higher standard versus matching talent to a position. In this kind of situation, it's often understood that companies will look for a long time because bringing in someone who can&rsquo;t enhance their competitive position just won't do them any good. Patience comes to those who wait and these companies are frequently willing to do so.</p> <p>This might explain why some of these coveted positions seem to be open for what seems like, well, forever.</p> <p>The rationale reminds me of how a music company decides whether they&rsquo;re going to sign an artist or not: Do they need to sign new artists? Of course. But the real question for them during an evaluation period is:&nbsp;<i>&ldquo;If we sign this artist, is he or she going to put our label on the map as a bonafide superstar? Are they going to have one hit after another, win a bundle of Grammy awards, sell millions upon millions of albums and have a die-hard loyal fan base? Is this the next Taylor Swift, Beyonce, etc.?&rdquo;</i></p> <p>They&rsquo;re looking at the artist they sign and evaluating their impact on a generation over the next decade or more. If they&rsquo;re a &ldquo;one hit wonder&rdquo; at best, will signing that artist do the record label any good? Questionable.</p> <p>In another example, look at any Olympic team in track and field, swimming, gymnastics, etc. Are these slots to be &ldquo;permanently&rdquo; filled? No. All you have to do as an athlete is compete at a higher level than a person already on the team and you&rsquo;ll knock them off the team.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s why a hiring manager can view their team through a lens we refer to as &ldquo;<b>Evergreen</b>&rdquo;: Their current team has a strong skill set for the time being but if and when they find a candidate who is even stronger, anything is possible and nothing is set in stone.</p> <p><b>Another reason jobs go unfilled forever? Too narrow of a focus.</b></p> <p>Picture a manager who has a very specific problem they need solved right now. With that specificity in mind, they look for the perfect candidate who has a&nbsp;<u>very particular skill set</u>&nbsp;to solve&nbsp;<u>that very particular challenge.</u></p> <p>You can see where this is headed, can&rsquo;t you?</p> <p>It&rsquo;s great if it works out, but all too often, the definition of the candidate is so narrow that the list of potential candidates who might be an ideal fit also narrows down dramatically.</p> <p>Along these same lines, certain companies insist on using a&nbsp;<b>test</b>&nbsp;to effectively identify the very best candidate possible. There&rsquo;s nothing wrong with that. However, if only a very finite number of people can legitimately&nbsp;<i>take</i>&nbsp;that test &ndash; the candidate pool can get awfully limited in a hurry and yes, perhaps too limited.</p> <p>For example, let&rsquo;s say that a company requires that all candidates for a particular role be required to take a test but they insist that only five percent of all candidates ultimately have access to the test.</p> <p>One of the primary skills of the position, in a given metropolitan area, is held by 10,000 people. Seems like a large number, doesn&rsquo;t it?</p> <p>However, we need to narrow the list down to a particular industry, which might take our once large pool of 10,000 people down to 1,000.</p> <p>Here&rsquo;s where the pool can become quite tiny: If the company insists that only five percent of candidates be able to take the test, 1,000 candidates remaining will dwindle down to no more than 50 candidates total.</p> <p>50 candidates would still appear to be a lot - but wait. We&rsquo;ve only identified these 50 people by virtue of them having a matching skill set. We still don&rsquo;t know&nbsp;<u>if they&rsquo;re interested in the position, if they&rsquo;re available for an interview or if they are affordable based on salary!</u></p> <p>Consequently, the hiring manager could be looking at a situation where that job could go unfilled for a while because the candidate pool is&nbsp;<i>too small.</i>&nbsp;They may have all the urgency in the world to fill a job, but it&rsquo;s tough to fill a job when the selection criteria of candidates is already so narrow and the expectation of them making a long-term positive contribution is already so great.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a combination that can bring a lot of uncertainty.</p> <p>Even doing well on the test is no &ldquo;sure thing.&rdquo; In fact, we were recently aiming to place a candidate and the initial signs were very positive. The candidate excelled on technical test portion of the company&rsquo;s hiring process but it was during the interview that there were issues because the answers he gave weren&rsquo;t quite to the company&rsquo;s satisfaction.</p> <p>Now, perhaps the interviewer had a very detailed and systematic approach to asking questions in that he wanted a&nbsp;<i>precise</i>&nbsp;answer to address each question rather than an answer that remotely veered off course a bit. In that type of situation, some candidates can have difficulty even though, at the same time, they may perform well during a test that requires them to solve problems.</p> <p>On the positive side, although it&rsquo;s becoming even more challenging to fill certain technology jobs, what that also tells me is that&nbsp;<b>technology jobs are becoming even more valuable to an organization</b>. It&rsquo;s a changing world in which the companies that are hiring tend to emphasize the kind of technology that is less than five years old.</p> <p>Candidates may find themselves with a higher bar to clear these days, but there&rsquo;s good news in that development too &ndash; regardless of whether a person has five years of experience or 25 years of experience,&nbsp;<b>candidates who are driven to get ahead and heavily invest the time in training for the interview process (including tests) can excel.</b>&nbsp;No longer can a candidate purely rely on what they already know. Those who push themselves to be proficient in new technologies while elevating their interviewing skills for technical jobs may be at the top of what is becoming an increasingly narrow list.</p> <p><b><i>Jobs can be open for an infinite period of time in some cases, but make no mistake &ndash; those conditions can change. At Roy Talman &amp; Associates, we understand the balance that must occur between being highly selective and highly attractive. If a company is selective and the candidate pool is tiny, that business will have a difficult time finding the diamond-in-the-rough talent they&rsquo;re seeking. So we work closely with those businesses to ensure their focus isn&rsquo;t so narrow that it limits their opportunities to identify a promising talent.</i></b></p> <p><b><i>Meanwhile, we also work with candidates to steer them in the proper direction as they strive to stand out in an increasingly competitive crowd. When you have over 30 years of recruiting experience as we do, even the most narrow windows of opportunity can open up quite a bit more.</i></b></p>http://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10Seeing, Not Imagining, The Candidate Is Believing http://www.roytalman.com?t=40&an=72141&anc=657&format=xml&p=8044 30 Nov 2017Blog<p>It&rsquo;s natural to assume that finding a new role can take a while, especially if the candidate has been with the same company for a very long time. There may be many resumes sent out, a number of interviews with various firms until an ideal match is found and &ndash; let&rsquo;s face it &ndash; in cases where a company values youth over experience, being over 40 years old doesn&rsquo;t necessarily make the job search any easier either.</p> <p>However, we were pleasantly surprised at Roy Talman &amp; Associates to encounter two situations that bucked this trend. Two candidates we were placing who were with their respective employers for over 10 years&hellip;received offers after interviewing with just <u>one</u> firm each.</p> <p><i>How does something like that happen? </i></p> <p>For one, <b>calling the right recruiter FIRST</b> is the critical first step. When you&rsquo;re working with a recruiter who has less credibility with a client and lacking knowledge of the recruiting process to come associated with that client, your resume can tend to fall into a black hole. In that event, the silence can be deafening! In contrast, if you can connect with a highly experienced recruiter who has a deep knowledge of the client&rsquo;s priorities, you can potentially avoid wasting a lot of valuable time with a company that isn&rsquo;t a clear fit.</p> <p>Next, <b>do you understand everything possible about the firm you&rsquo;re about to interview with?</b> What do you know about their history? What sort of culture do they have? Where does the leadership seem to want to direct the company tomorrow? If you come into an interview without this depth of knowledge, it could lead to an uncomfortable situation where it looks like you want the job at all costs but haven&rsquo;t taken the time to know the company in the process.</p> <p>There&rsquo;s also <b>no such thing as preparing too much for the interview.</b> Interviewing is a potential minefield in which you could step in the wrong direction and &ldquo;blow up&rdquo; based on your answer. While we can&rsquo;t predict every question an interviewer may ask, we can certainly plan for many possible scenarios and tests. Simply having a partial road map of where the interview process could go will give you the game plan you need to go into the interview with greater confidence &ndash; which matters a tremendous amount.</p> <p>Another crucial piece of the equation: A <b><i>personal interaction</i> with the candidate</b> can dramatically change any preconceived notions about that individual a hiring manager might have.</p> <p>This is to say that in the real world, a hiring authority will know they want to hire the person after they meet the person. But the person they actually end up hiring <i>isn&rsquo;t exactly the same person they envisioned they would hire for the role.</i></p> <p>Two of the most successful people in the last 100 years express this sentiment well:</p> <p><i>&ldquo;If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.&rdquo;</i> &ndash; Henry Ford</p> <p><i>&ldquo;A lot of times, people don&rsquo;t know what they want until you show it to them.&quot;</i> &ndash; Steve Jobs</p> <p><b>With this in mind, what does it mean if the person ultimately hired is going to wind up being so different from the candidate &ldquo;on paper&rdquo;?</b></p> <p>Let&rsquo;s recognize a fatal flaw in trying to identify a fit <u>based purely on a job description</u>. Many job descriptions are recycled because they&rsquo;re easy to dash off quickly with a lot of HR &ldquo;boilerplate&rdquo; language inserted in like &ldquo;<i>progressive organization</i>,&rdquo; &ldquo;<i>team-oriented environment</i>,&rdquo; and &ldquo;<i>self-starter</i>.&rdquo; Or you could see the reverse in which every possible responsibility is stuffed into the description because the person writing the job description assumes the person looking at the job only reads the job title. Everything else underneath that title is too much information.</p> <p>From the candidate&rsquo;s perspective, you want somebody to sit down and understand your story. Your recruiter is going to be, essentially, your marketer. So they need to be able to figure out what's marketable about your skills, how to present it and who to present it to. If you're a job seeker, it's nice to have a really competent, knowledgeable person putting out a one-of-a-kind, unique infomercial about you to some of the more selective companies around.</p> <p><b><i>If you&rsquo;re going to hire a person based on the actual interaction you have versus the image of that candidate in your mind, it demands a more personalized approach from the beginning with a specialized recruiter like Roy Talman &amp; Associates. It&rsquo;s a more intelligent, focused approach to recruitment that both candidates and the companies considering them deserve.</i></b></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>http://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10In Recruiting, Personalization Beats “Blasting” Any Day http://www.roytalman.com?t=40&an=71634&anc=657&format=xml&p=8044 10 Nov 2017Blog<p>From where I sit, having an inside view of what's going on in the recruiting space, traditional contingency recruiters have expressed how they&rsquo;re having a hard time in their line of work in recent years.</p> <p>Between online tools such as LinkedIn and internal referrals, the competition for placing people in &quot;regular jobs&quot; is more challenging than ever. Why? For one, since it's so easy to apply, certain jobs will get a very large number of applications. Modern systems will then automatically shoot out a polite message that sounds something like, &ldquo;Thank you, we received your message. If we're interested, we'll get back to you.&quot; In the vast majority of the cases, only a very small percentage of these inquiries will actually get a response.</p> <p>Consequently, more recruiters are being pushed toward finding some really hard-to-find people in a tight window of time. However, where they could afford to rely on more of a templated approach to candidate communication with that audience, they can&rsquo;t do the same among more sophisticated roles that demand a more personalized approach. If the message from the recruiter feels impersonal, the candidate for a highly specialized position will know it and move on.</p> <h3>Many Tools Out There To &ldquo;Make It Easy&rdquo; Aren&rsquo;t Helping</h3> <p>Recruiting also continues to go down a path that&rsquo;s quite impersonal in part due to the tools in the marketplace that make it easy to do so. Take ZipRecruiter, for example, with a pitch that they&rsquo;ll get your job seen on a large number of websites. Or do a search on Google for Java-based jobs in Chicago and you&rsquo;ll not only see there are over 2,000 of those jobs that aren&rsquo;t listed separately but you can go to Indeed.com and see an ocean of them.</p> <p>This begs the question: With that kind of saturation, why do we need to create 200 versions of an ad to describe the same or similar job posting? Does it really add much value?</p> <p>With tools that favor &ldquo;blasting&rdquo; out job postings, companies become spammers and candidates quite often either don&rsquo;t read the job or don&rsquo;t find there's enough information in each job. None of these outcomes are desirable.</p> <p>Now, a hiring manager could write a five-page job description that spells out in excruciating detail everything the person will be doing, might be doing, should have done, could be able to do, the essential skills required and more. But there are some downsides to this:</p> <p>&middot;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Who's going to read all that?</p> <p>&middot;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The description of the role may change five minutes after the posting is sent</p> <p>&middot;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It&rsquo;s all negotiable anyway</p> <p>Here&rsquo;s an example of what we mean by that third point: One of our clients told us about the type of candidate they were looking for &ndash; all core Java developers of a certain type.</p> <p>Well, wouldn't you know it? The person they wound up hiring doesn't really do Java! He does C Sharp. As it turns out, he's a superb software developer and there are enough similarities between C Sharp and Java that the client discovered it was going to take this hire a fairly short time to go through the learning curve to learn what he does now.</p> <p>From this point of view, insisting that you need to have so many years of experience with this or that particular technology quite often turns out to be less critical than you originally thought. Whenever we try to describe what we need and want, what we&rsquo;re really doing is envisioning an idealized future of what the job probably will have and the probable skills the person needs to have.</p> <h3>Seeing &ndash; Not Imagining &ndash; The Candidate Is Believing</h3> <p>Two of the most successful people in the last 100 years express it well:</p> <p>&ldquo;If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.&rdquo; &ndash; Henry Ford</p> <p>&ldquo;A lot of times, people don&rsquo;t know what they want until you show it to them.&quot; &ndash; Steve Jobs</p> <p>This is to say that in the real world, a hiring authority will know they want to hire the person after they meet the person. But the person they actually end up hiring isn&rsquo;t exactly the same person they envisioned they would hire for the role.</p> <p>With this in mind, what does it mean if the person ultimately hired is going to wind up being so different from the candidate &ldquo;on paper&rdquo;?</p> <p>For one, let&rsquo;s recognize a fatal flaw in trying to identify a fit based purely on a job description. Many job descriptions are recycled because they&rsquo;re easy to dash off quickly with a lot of HR &ldquo;boilerplate&rdquo; language inserted in like &ldquo;progressive organization,&rdquo; &ldquo;team-oriented environment,&rdquo; and &ldquo;self-starter.&rdquo; Or you could see the reverse in which every possible responsibility is stuffed into the description because the person writing the job description assumes the person looking at the job only reads the job title. Everything else underneath that title is too much information.</p> <p>Companies may not absolutely know who&rsquo;s really in the market for a job, but that doesn&rsquo;t mean &ldquo;blasting&rdquo; a job out there across the online spectrum is a great approach. Yes, you still need to reach out to a certain number of people &ndash; the key phrase being &ldquo;certain&rdquo; number of people. Not all of them.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re going to hire a person based on the actual interaction you have versus the image of that candidate in your mind, it demands a more personalized approach from the beginning with a specialized recruiter like Roy Talman &amp; Associates.</p> <p>From the candidate&rsquo;s perspective, you want somebody to sit down and understand your story. Your recruiter is going to be, essentially, your marketer. So they need to be able to figure out what's marketable about your skills, how to present it and who to present it to. If you're a job seeker, it's nice to have a really competent, knowledgeable person putting out a one-of-a-kind, unique infomercial about you to some of the more selective companies around.</p> <p>In that moment, it&rsquo;s our job to be the first phone call the candidate makes. That&rsquo;s the advantage of going to Roy Talman &amp; Associates as opposed to distributing their information far and wide. It&rsquo;s a more intelligent, focused approach to recruitment that both candidates and the companies considering them deserve.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3>&nbsp;</h3>http://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10Do You Need To Be Unhappy To Leave Your Job?http://www.roytalman.com/7D1AB9/assets/files/News/TalmanUnhappyToLeaveJob4DG.pdf19 Oct 2017Bloghttp://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10Will Hiring Managers Respect Online Education Anytime Soon?http://www.roytalman.com/7D1AB9/assets/files/News/TalmanOnlineLearning4DG.pdf02 Oct 2017Bloghttp://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10What If Machines Evolve Our Jobs Rather Than Take Them?http://www.roytalman.com/7D1AB9/assets/files/News/TalmanMachinesEvolve2DG.pdf14 Sep 2017Bloghttp://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10What’s The Real Story On Chicago’s Tech Hub Status?http://www.roytalman.com/7D1AB9/assets/files/News/TalmanTechHub1DG.pdf28 Aug 2017Bloghttp://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10Why Coding Bootcamps and Online Learning Matter More Than Everhttp://www.roytalman.com/7D1AB9/assets/files/News/TalmanBootcamps2DG.pdf16 Aug 2017Blog<h3> <p><b>Why Coding Bootcamps <br /> and Online Learning Matter More Than Ever</b></p> <p>In recent years, computer coding &ldquo;bootcamps&rdquo; in which students can get up to speed quite quickly on a particular programming language have seemed to become a hot trend.</p> <p>Even so, I&rsquo;m sure there are some who ask, <i>&ldquo;Are these bootcamps and online learning environments a viable option to consider alongside some of the more traditional avenues of education?&rdquo;</i></p> <p>In my opinion, the answer is an unequivocal &ldquo;yes.&rdquo;</p> <p>Coding bootcamps deserve to be fully supported even as they may be in need of some adjustments in their mission and in terms of who they let into the program. If that can be achieved, we&rsquo;ll see a higher percentage of successful graduates who go on to fully utilize what they&rsquo;ve learned in the field, which should only lead to higher credibility in the eyes of hiring managers.</p> <p>How do we improve upon this foundation? Part of the issue comes down to the type of people coming into the program, their ability to handle such an intense course and, if they graduate, how they apply their newfound skills successfully.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Coding Bootcamps Aren&rsquo;t For Everyone.<br /> So Why Position Them That Way?</b></p> <p>Rather than having an open view of teaching <i>anyone</i> to code as many of them do, coding bootcamps need to identify more students who can withstand the rigorous agenda and are well-focused on programming or software engineering roles.</p> <p>Case in point: Consider the kind of individual who typically succeeds in such development camps. Is it someone who has always had a deep interest for the subject matter for many years prior? Are they already in the field and looking to upgrade an existing set of programming languages with a new one?</p> <p>Not always.</p> <p>You&rsquo;re frequently talking about someone who has been accepted into a leading university but studied subjects that are not the most marketable (History or Philosophy, for example). So they enter the marketplace and realize, &ldquo;<i>Hmm. Perhaps I should consider doing something else that will pay me more than what I studied</i>.&rdquo;</p> <p>Now, some of these individuals who start with a blank slate will be surprisingly even better for learning new things than those who have spent years coding. Yet there is no question that the unique format of the bootcamp is not for everyone, which leads us to the other type of individuals who can often be found in such bootcamps &ndash; the ones who may ultimately find that they hate the bootcamp after a short period of time and drop out.</p> <p>Let&rsquo;s face it. It takes a special kind of person to thrive in a very intense accelerated learning environment. The majority of people just can&rsquo;t handle it.</p> <p>On the positive side, those who stick with a bootcamp program and see it through will have the ability to study certain technology-oriented subjects in just 10 weeks (or 16 weeks, 24 weeks, etc.) and be marvelously productive in the next chapter of their careers.</p> <p>That&rsquo;s why coding bootcamps still matter so much. Traditional learning environments are still exceptional and accept highly talented students into their programs, but it&rsquo;s hard to ignore the fact that, for certain specialized subjects, bootcamps are accelerating learning for a whole new group of individuals at unprecedented levels.</p> <p>Yes, bootcamps need many more of the types of individuals with the mental fortitude to push through the program to reach completion. But those who do may find the bootcamp propels their career forward in amazing ways due to how quickly they&rsquo;ve learned an important new programming language.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition to the speed factor, there&rsquo;s also the matter of the outstanding value in that <b>coding bootcamps may present the most cost-effective educational system there is.</b> Think about it &ndash; if one program costs $10,000 over a 10-week period and you successfully complete the program, you have excellent chance at obtaining a job that may pay you more than a four-year college degree &ndash; which, by the way, is going to cost you a <u>lot</u> more than $10,000.</p> <p>In addition to bootcamps, there is another non-traditional route for learning that is due to go through its own transformation: Online learning.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>The Next Level Of Online Learning</b></p> <p>As we&rsquo;ve watched the expansion in number of coding bootcamps, at the same time, there is also a rise in the number of online classes available through avenues like Coursera and Udemy, which are designed to have millions of students. Assuming you&rsquo;re a disciplined individual, you can take all of your classes online, including your tests and pay the necessary fees for said classes and tests.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a fine way to learn, but here too, there&rsquo;s room for improvement in the model. Fortunately, I believe before long we&rsquo;re going to see an entrepreneur or two look at the model of online learning and say, &quot;<i>You know what? We should have in-person classes that will be based on online material. We don't need to provide any of the material, but we will help the student beyond what they can do on their own.&rdquo;</i></p> <p>In essence, what you will have is <b>a traditional school that&rsquo;s built around an online university </b>that still charges only $10,000 or so a year.</p> <p>The more that hiring managers are willing to accept individuals who have completed an online education (just like their willingness to accept people who completed coding bootcamps), the more the value of online education will become clearer. Once the hiring manager sees that it&rsquo;s not going to cost them $40,000 &ndash; $50,000 a year to hold somebody's hand in order for them to get up to speed when the material is already online for that person to learn from, online learning should be seen as an incredibly viable option.</p> <p>As a result, the potential is great that both online classes and coding bootcamps can become much larger than the current states they are in &ndash; rather than say, a 10-week experience or a class, we can see both continuing to grow into highly credible brands, even more so than they&rsquo;ve been before.</p> <p>Some online courses feature topics that are so advanced that they&rsquo;re almost impossible to have in a more traditional classroom setting, such as Machine Learning courses. Take this example of a Machine Learning course from Stanford:</p> <p><a href="https://www.class-central.com/mooc/835/coursera-machine-learning">https://www.class-central.com/mooc/835/coursera-machine-learning</a></p> <p>Available through Coursera, this course shows students how to teach a computer to learn concepts using data but without explicitly programming the machine. So beyond learning about the best machine learning techniques, there is actual implementation of these techniques. Students are able to apply learning algorithms to build smart robots, text understanding, computer vision, medical informatics, database mining and more.</p> <p>All in all, when you can more easily transform more people into producers who create a lot of value for their organizations, a host of benefits can ensue.</p> <p>Coding bootcamps and online learning environments haven&rsquo;t outlived their usefulness by any means &ndash; just the opposite. Over time, we&rsquo;re likely to see an evolution of both that demand our support to improve upon these worthy outlets more than ever.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>What About Traditional Learning Environments? </b></p> <p><b>Do They Still Matter?</b></p> <p>Absolutely. Make no mistake: Just because bootcamps and online learning may grow in popularity doesn&rsquo;t mean that we can or should ignore how well our traditional educational institutions tend to supply us with top name talent. Hiring managers continue to have high respect for these traditional learning environments and smart recruiters should do the same.</p> <p>Therefore, it&rsquo;s vital that we consider all three of these avenues &ndash; traditional classrooms, online learning and coding bootcamps &ndash; as important ways to equip candidates for long-term success. The stronger all three of them are, the more options there are for candidates and hiring managers to find an ideal fit &ndash; and for deeply experienced recruiters like Roy Talman &amp; Associates to bring those parties together.</p> <p><b><i>If you&rsquo;re considering a coding bootcamp or online learning environment to upgrade your skill set but you&rsquo;d like the peace of mind that you&rsquo;re making a wise investment based on current industry and technological trends, talk to us at Roy Talman &amp; Associates. With the perspective of over 30 years of experience, we can have a larger conversation with you about where you&rsquo;d like to steer your career path from here and the type of adjustments that need to be made now to ensure alignment with the industry you want to thrive in for years to come.&nbsp;</i></b></p> </h3>http://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10Will Tests And “Brain-Teasers” Reveal Your Next Golden Hire?http://www.roytalman.com/7D1AB9/assets/files/News/TalmanTestsBrainTeasers2DG.pdf20 Jul 2017Bloghttp://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10They Can't Advertise To Customers So How Do They Promote Themselves To Candidates?http://www.roytalman.com/7D1AB9/assets/files/News/TalmanHighRegFirms2DG.pdf11 Jul 2017Bloghttp://www.roytalman.com?t=39&format=xml&directive=0&stylesheet=rss&records=10